Port Melbourne House by Pandolfini Architects

 
The pitched roof forms of the new addition respond to the traditional rooflines of the adjacent terrace houses but present a contrast with their black zinc cladding and lack of ornament.
— From the architects

Project Information

Architects _ Pandolfini Architects _ @pandolfini_architects
Location _ Port Melbourne, Victoria
Photo _ Rory Gardiner _ @arorygardiner
Furniture & Styling _ Nina Provan _ @nina_provan
Builder _ Duobuilt

 
 

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Architect’s Statement

“Located in the bayside suburb of Port Melbourne and within the confines of a long narrow site with strict heritage and planning controls, the aim of this project was to create a family home with an abundant sense of space and light. The new addition exploits the relationship between the new and old sections of built form to create dramatic spaces not typically associate with terrace houses.  

The front section of the existing century-old terrace house was carefully restored and the new addition sited so as to be invisible from the street. A 6m high circulation space and an adjacent courtyard garden separate the old and new sections of house and provide a clear delineation between the two. External materials of black zinc and textured concrete render are used internally here to reinforce the sense of exiting one space and transitioning into another.

The pitched roof forms of the new addition respond to the traditional rooflines of the adjacent terrace houses but present a contrast with their black zinc cladding and lack of ornament. A single and double storey volume form the new addition and are separated by large skylight which spans the full width of the property, providing a gap in the built form which allows natural light to penetrate into the deep plan. External zinc cladding again extends inside here, accentuating the two volumes and making them clearly readable from inside the house.

A restrained palette of materials continues internally where a simple, hardwearing palette of concrete and black steel provide a robust backdrop for the finely detailed American oak cabinetry.

The alterations and additions to this once dark and cramped terrace house have successfully created spaces full of natural light and with unexpected volume typically found in much larger, less confined projects.”

Sustainability Statement

“The alterations and additions to this 100 year old terrace house have greatly increased its sustainable design credentials and have ensure the house will continue to contribute to the streetscape, whilst having a greatly reduced environmental footprint, for many years to come. The original section of house has had bulk thermal insulation inserted into the previously empty underfloor, wall and roof cavities and hydronic heating panels have replaced the original electric wall heaters. The double height circulation space between the old and new addition works to draw heat up and out of the ground floor, with operable windows at the top of the 6m high space allowing the hot air to be expelled. The large internal courtyard has greatly increased access to natural light and cross ventilation.”

 
 
 
 

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